The great field season of 2015

These are the travels of this year's main field season.

These are the travels of this year’s main field season.

I have been out doing field work across Sweden since 30 March and arrived home today on 18 June, marking the end of the field season. The work revolved around looking at how much moose forage on trees.

It has been 61 hard, cold, windy and rainy field days. I have driven 11 339 kilometers, worked across 8 counties, spent nights next to alpine mountains, even hiking up on one and had baths in rivers and lakes with outside temperatures of five degrees Celsius.

Moose forage on pine trees in winter.

Moose forage on pine trees in winter.

I have seen the world’s longest aerial lift in Västerbotten and seen numerous moose, roe deer, semi-domestic reindeer, European vipers, hares and even a female brown bear with three cubs.

I was last stationed far north, west of Skellefteå – and up there sunset and sunrise come together as it barely gets darker around midnight.

Roe deer is especially common in the southern third of Sweden and along the east coast, but can nowadays be found almost across the whole country

Roe deer is especially common in the southern third of Sweden and along the east coast, but can nowadays be found almost across the whole country

The view over Lunndörrsfjällen from western Jämtland.

The view north over Lunndörrsfjällen from western Jämtland.

Combined sunset and sunrise in Skråmträsk, Västerbotten. It is actually not as dark as the picture shows. It is just a bit darker than daylight.

Combined sunset and sunrise in Skråmträsk, Västerbotten on 16 June at 11:40 pm. It is actually not as dark as the picture shows. It is just a bit darker than daylight around midnight.

The view from Munsfjället in Jämtland.

The view south from Munsfjället in Jämtland.

It is good to be back home. It is time to relax from field work for the time being and focus on new projects.

Semi-domestic reindeer are common in northern Sweden. They are owned by the Sami minority but are free-ranging.

Semi-domestic reindeer are common in northern Sweden. They are owned by the Sami minority but are free-ranging.

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